Acronym Soup: What is DXE?

Feb 8, 2019 | Tech Blog

In today’s “Acronym Soup” blog post, we will be taking a peek into one of the phases a system goes through during power on and ask the question: What is DXE?

The acronym DXE stands for Driver eXecution Environment and begins after the Pre-EFI Initialization (PEI) phase or in the presence of a valid Hand-Off Block (HOB) list. The DXE phase consists of a few components, DXE Core, DXE Dispatcher, and DXE drivers. The Core component is responsible for producing a set of Boot Services, DXE, Services, and Runtime Services. The Dispatcher component is responsible for discovering and executing DXE drivers in the correct order. Finally, the drivers are responsible for initializing, chipset, processor, and platform components. The DXE phase has a sub phase known the boot device selection (BDS) phase for booting an operating system

The DXE Phase ends when the operating system is successfully booted. The only things that remains of DXE phase are runtime data structures and services allocated by the DXE Core along with services and data structures produced by runtime DXE drivers.

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AMI is Firmware Reimagined for modern computing. As a global leader in Dynamic Firmware for security, orchestration and manageability solutions, AMI enables the world’s compute platforms from on-premises to the cloud to the edge. AMI’s industry-leading foundational technology and unwavering customer support have generated lasting partnerships and spurred innovation for some of the most prominent brands in the high-tech industry. AMI is also a critical provider to the Open Compute ecosystem and is a member of numerous industry associations and standards groups, such as the Unified EFI Forum (UEFI), PICMG, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Cybersecurity Excellence Partnership (NCEP), and the Trusted Computing Group (TCG).

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